061: Leverage Your Presence on TV with Ari Taub

 

“Being real, being honest and being yourself is the best way to develop a relationship with people.”

 

In this episode, Jay talks with former Canadian Olympic wrestler Ari Taub, who has launched the Entrepreneur’s TV Network.  Ari and Jay discuss how sports are a training ground for business, pursuing undiscovered opportunities, how to make video marketing part of your mix, gaining traction through video, repurposing content and so much more….  Ari also shares a special opportunity with listeners that want to get on his Entrepreneur’s TV Network!

 

Episode Highlights

00:58 What is Entrepreneur’s TV Network
03:00 Watching Video = Learning
09:48 Challenges In Creating Videos
22:47 Ari’s Story: How Sports Became His Training Ground For Business
38:23 How To Make Great Videos
43:13 Supporting Entrepreneurs

 

@JayRooke and @aritaub discuss how sports are a training ground for business, pursuing undiscovered opportunities, how to make video marketing part of your mix, gaining traction through video, repurposing content and so much more at… Click To Tweet

Connect with Ari

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ari.taub
Twitter: https://twitter.com/aritaub
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/aritaub/

 

Connect with Entrepreneurs TV Network

Website: https://www.entrepreneursnetwork.tv
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EntrepreneursTVNetwork/
Email: ari@aritaub.com

 

Inspirational Quotes:

  • “People learn by watching videos.” ~ Ari Taub
  • “Being real, being honest and being yourself is the best way to develop a relationship with people.” ~ Ari Taub

 

Transcriptions:

JAY: Hey everybody, Jay Rooke here your hosts of Know Pain, Know Gain, Entrepreneurship Made Real. We’re here today with Ari Taub, founder of entrepreneur’s TV network. Alright thanks so much for joining us today.

ARI TAUB: You’re welcome. Thanks for having me.

JAY: Are you continuing our theme of a, of having Canadians on the show? What part of a Canada are you?

ARI TAUB: I live in Calgary.

JAY: Right on. Right on. Excellent. So all right. Tell us, you know what Entrepreneurs TV network is all about?

ARI TAUB: Entrepreneurs TV network is platform where we get videos from all kinds of entrepreneurs around the world and we put them all together and we get these videos onto TV platforms around the world. So basically we take videos from entrepreneurs and we get them on to TV.

JAY: Super exciting. And what type of TV?

ARI TAUB: Anything from major broadcasters like Comcast to telephone companies like China Mobile. And have 750 million viewers in China to new digital platforms like digital cable companies like Zumo to traditional apps like Ios, android, apple TV, Roku, Amazon, everything you can think of is really now considered TV.

JAY: –Yup. Yup.

ARI TAUB: And we get videos put everywhere.

JAY: Exciting. So you’re basically helping folks that are looking to get more exposure and branding and you’re just kind of content out there doing a better job of helping them distribute it and get in front of more eyeballs.

ARI TAUB: Yeah. And we do a really good job of providing credibility because not many entrepreneurs have their video on real TV.

JAY: –Sure.

ARI TAUB: Yeah.

JAY: Exciting. You know, I think back to, so I’m 42 years old and part of that generation that grew up analog but then crossed over to digital and I think about what my childhood would have been like if I grew up in modern times, you know, and had Youtube at my fingertips and everything related to that. And I particularly think about athletics and you know, I remember going to the local library and renting sports illustrated had a whole series on every sport. And you know, it’d be, he was Larry Bird’s tips on how to shoot three pointers, you know, here’s how to shoot a slap shot, etc. And it was better than nothing. But as you can imagine, trying to learn how to do those things through reading was not the most effective way to go about, I think about what would it be like to be able to teach yourself just about anything off of Youtube right now in this wealth of data that we have. And so what I love about what you’re working on is entrepreneurship is so hard and there’s so many different angles out there. And so being able to bring all of those voices together, all of those experts that wisdom together so that other entrepreneurs can learn from entrepreneurs, uh, shorten their learning curves, make less mistakes, and essentially providing a library of entrepreneurship is super compelling to me.

ARI TAUB: Yeah, I think you’re 100% right. In fact, I’m just working on a list right now on why people would want to use videos. And, and one of the top reasons is that people learn by watching videos now they, they’re watching videos on mobile devices and that’s how they’re learning about the world. These things that people call explainer videos are super popular now.

JAY: –Yup.

ARI TAUB: And it’s really important, like you said, to explain what you’re doing in video because most people don’t care enough to go find the book –

JAY: –Right.

ARI TAUB: -or, or go find a research article. They would rather watch something on youtube or on a different TV platform.

JAY: Yeah. And also the medium just worked better, I think for certain, uh, content producers, you know, see that. So if we picture the person out there that either is not a strong writer or doesn’t have the time to write slash they might also be that really magnetic, charismatic personality that doesn’t get to come through, you know, the written word as well. And so being able to connect and engage with one’s target audience, I think, uh, via video is just a richer, more, more sticky engagement.

ARI TAUB: Yeah. You’re 100% right and it’s also the most efficient way to create all of your marketing because when you make a video, you can also take the audio recording of it and make a podcast like we’re doing.

JAY: –Sure.

ARI TAUB: And you can transcribe the words that you say and make a blog post. And if we do a video like we’re doing now, that’s fairly long, we can also cut that up into shorter clips and so we can actually sit in front of the camera for an hour and create many, many hours, worth of video and other types of social posting all at the same time.

JAY: Yup. That makes a ton of sense to me. So uh, we had a guest on probably roughly 20 episodes ago named Matt Pool and he had a company called a two minute tours and it was all about creating two minute videos where folks would kind of unbox their business. And one of his big points was, you know exactly what you’re saying that you can repurpose all this content. It was super-efficient. And then sort of on the flip side of it, how some entrepreneurs struggle to kind of get their messaging out or start to talk about themselves. And I think one of the benefits about video is you can be real. There’s certain folks that produce content that like to come across as polished and perfect and that might work for them and they can put a bunch more time into it. But also that there’s nothing wrong with a couple of hiccups in a video or a person coming across authentically as they are. I think oftentimes it draws viewers in more to see that vulnerability and realness with people.

ARI TAUB: I think you’re right. I think coming across as authentic and actually doing authentic videos is the right thing to do. You know, having good video quality and doing some editing, you know, is super important as well.

JAY: –Yup.

ARI TAUB: But being real and being honest and being yourself is the best way to develop a relationship with people.

JAY: Yeah, that’s what I mean, that the quality’s got to be there for sure. Can you share with me what was your inspiration for getting this, this project going? Because it sounds like a fairly Herculean undertaking to both source all this content and then get all the distribution down lines down. And you know, your competition’s got to be out there as well.

ARI TAUB: So the genesis of this was when I started a sports league in 2009 –

JAY: –Yeah.

ARI TAUB: -and I thought I was in the business of selling tickets and filling a venue and, and when the event ended, you know, that sort of part of the business and it, and then, you know, a couple of months later we try and fill a room again and have another event.

JAY: –Yep.

ARI TAUB: Which I think looks a lot like what people in the coach speaker on, you know, –

JAY: –Sure

ARI TAUB: -space do all the time right now. And what really changed things for me was in 2011 I got a TV deal with ESPN in 40 countries.

JAY: –Hello.

ARI TAUB: And so I went from putting on an event and at the end of the five hours, you know, we went home and that was it too, while we recorded the thing. And then we edited videos and we got those videos on TV forever. And, and I’m still getting publicity and promotion from those videos. I still make money from those videos.

JAY: –Awesome.

ARI TAUB: Eight years later.

JAY: –Yeah.

ARI TAUB: And you know, then we decided that it was important to tell stories about our athletes. And so we started making biographical documentaries on them, –

JAY: –Yeah.

ARI TAUB: -sort of like ESPN 30 for 30’s.

JAY: –Sure.

ARI TAUB: And we used all of this video to post on our social platforms like Facebook. And now we have over a million fans on Facebook.

JAY: –Wow.

ARI TAUB: And so video just, you know, I like it just kind of morphed into something that seemed really important in the more we used it, the better and cooler it seemed. And then, uh, last year I was, I was talking to some of our mutual friends in, in the personal development space and asking them what they do with video. And the response I got back was actually not much other than Facebook lives.

JAY: –Right.

ARI TAUB: And so I realized right away there was an opportunity to, to help, you know, the right sort of coach, speaker, author, entrepreneur, get extra credibility, get onto TV, get an extra promotion.

JAY: Yeah, totally. And you know, and for those types of folks, I think there’s such value in a, whether it’s a prospective client that you want to send the video too or it’s somebody that’s doing a research about potentially working with you, etc., to be able to have these video bites that you send people and let them test drive you a little bit in, like you said earlier, getting that initial credibility to trust and lean in. So that next step of the, uh, the sales process, I’ve got to assume as a compelling argument for why folks who join the platform.

ARI TAUB: Yeah. I, I think it’s a compelling argument for why folks would actually make video.

JAY: –Yep.

ARI TAUB: And once you’re making the video, my theory is that you ought to try and use that video as much as possible. Get it seen as much as possible, get as much credibility and be seen as an expert as much as possible from that video. It takes a bunch of time and energy and sometimes expense to make the video.

JAY: –Yup.

ARI TAUB: And once we’re making it, we might as well make maximum use of it.

JAY: For sure. And so what are some of the common or hurdles that you see entrepreneurs or coaches and speakers, etc., encountering when they try to start to work with video?

ARI TAUB: I think the biggest hurdle is that they don’t really understand why video is important.

JAY: –Hmm Mm.

ARI TAUB: They don’t see the need for video. And the analogy I use is, it’s kind of like the pony express. Like when that started up it was kind of cool because all of a sudden mail got delivered you know by a horse and carriage.

JAY: –Yeah.

ARI TAUB: And then people thought, well that was, that was it. Like that was what we were gonna do. And then all of a sudden trains started and the pony express to die.

JAY: –Hmm Mm.

ARI TAUB: And I think we’re in the middle of this revolution where people who are creating video in business, our dad.

JAY: –Yeah.

ARI TAUB: They don’t know it yet. They are like the Pony Express. And, and if you look at at the new generation, the younger kids, they are learning everything about the world through their phones, through their mobile devices on video. And even my dad who’s you know just turned 75 like he learns stuff that people are googling things there. They’re looking on their phones for explainer videos and to do research –

JAY: –Yeah.

ARI TAUB: -and the most important thing to understand about how people consume video and learn is they want to watch what they want to watch when they want to watch it on whatever device they want, watch it on. And if we’re not there, they’ll watch someone else’s video.

JAY: Truth. Yeah, for sure. And so as you’ve developed this platform, I’ve got to send that, one of the larger challenges is now you’ve got to get eyeballs and traffic going to the network and so how do you get that going and get known in a space where there’s already some folks that have a bit of a head start on you but perhaps don’t have this same niche carved up?

ARI TAUB: Actually, I don’t think there are any folks doing what I’m doing that have a head start on me.

JAY: –Oh Nice. Okay. Do Tell.

ARI TAUB: I think that people, this space that are trying to promote something similar actually aren’t doing it the right way. I think the opportunity is to partner with broadcasters around the world and JAY: –Hmm.

ARI TAUB: -give them a solution. What I see in the market right now is, is people offering to make you your own Roku App. Uh, you know –

JAY: –Right.

ARI TAUB: -and I think that is just creating a bigger problem for an entrepreneur.

JAY: –Agreed.

ARI TAUB: The entrepreneurs I think need to understand, they would benefit from understanding how this ecosystem works. And in general it’s important for entrepreneurs to create video –

JAY: –Yup.

ARI TAUB: -and then it’s important for them to stick the video where lots of people are going to see them, they, they’re already all doing stuff on their own social platforms where they have to create their Facebook pages and they have to populate it with video than they have to make sure that people go and watch it and then they have to make sure that they make enough video to keep people interested. We know from, from stats around Netflix that people’s biggest complaints around Netflix is that there’s not enough content.

JAY: –how funny is that?

ARI TAUB: Crazy when you think about it, but people like it, love it, want more of it, whatever that topic is. And so if you find an entrepreneur that’s interested in meditation and you’ve got your own little channel with five meditation videos, that’s great.

JAY: –Sure.

ARI TAUB: But what happens in an hour when they’re bored?

JAY: –Right.

ARI TAUB: There has to be more video. And so it’s really important to have your video in shirted with enough other videos so that you can keep a viewer’s attention long enough. And it’s important to have those videos on platforms where people like China Mobile have an interest in, in driving the viewers.

JAY: –Right.

ARI TAUB: The entrepreneur already has their own social platform where they have to figure out how to drive the viewers.

JAY: –Yep.

ARI TAUB: The idea is how do you get your video on Comcast where Comcast brings the viewers or on China Mobile where they ring as you are.

JAY: –Right.

ARI TAUB: We’re on Zumo, which is like a digital Comcast where they bring the viewers, that’s the secret sauce and no one’s really doing

JAY: Brilliant. So, uh, you know, I recognize that you’re running a, you know, the TV network here, but do you view yourself, I guess is more of a PR slash marketing company?

ARI TAUB: I don’t think I’m a ER marketing company. I think what I’m really good at is putting a lot of videos together and figuring out how to get them seen on platforms around the world, –

JAY: –Yep.

ARI TAUB: -which are considered TV platforms.

JAY: –Hmm Mm.

ARI TAUB: That I think is, is sort of the secret sauce. I think what comes out of it is I end up doing some things that traditional marketing or PR agencies say that they do.

JAY: Yup. Yup. That makes sense. Talk a little bit, you know, I hear you describing what you’re doing. I watch a lot of folks in the space, like you said, create their own stuff, but then really stumble on getting eyeballs on it. And what’s sad is that the time investment is so lopsided. You know, they’ll put seven hours in to make a solid five minute video that five people click on and you know, two of them where their parents and the other one was their sister and the other was their best friend type of deal and just not getting that traction going. And then on the other hand, I guess one that I would see with some frequency, to your point around creating enough content is entrepreneurs, coaches, experts, etc., that don’t really feel they have enough content to create a video when we both know, you know they have more content than they could talk through in a week. And so how do you work with them to get those initial videos out and make them realize that it’s not that daunting of a process.

ARI TAUB: The reality is that the first thing we need is for entrepreneurs to buy into the concept.

JAY: –Hmm.

ARI TAUB: That they really just need to turn their camera on and not turn it off.

JAY: –Hmm Mm.

ARI TAUB: And that will give them a bank of video to play with and then they need to understand that an option like entrepreneurs TV network exists.

JAY: –Yep.

ARI TAUB: It’s really easy to get the video up to me. And then the third thing to understand is now it becomes my problem. It’s not their problem anymore. They don’t have to drive traffic to their own Youtube channel or Facebook channel. Now it’s my problem. I have to get their video onto TD.

JAY: –Yep.

ARI TAUB: I’d have to get a whole bunch of people to watch it. That’s my job. My job is to send them an email that says, hey Jay, you can now put on your website that you are on TV.

JAY: –Sure.

ARI TAUB: That’s my job.

JAY: Like it. I like that a lot. All right, let’s do this. Let’s take a quick pause and hear from our commercial sponsors when we come back. Love to hear more of your story around this and the common flaws you see entrepreneurs making and you’ve got some interesting background with Olympic wrestling that I’d love to touch on. So let’s do a quick pause and we’ll be right back. Folks, we’re here today with Ari Taub founder of entrepreneur’s TV network are one of the things that we’ve spoken on the show before is about how rapidly this entire digital marketing landscape is changing and how for you know, your average bear. That’s a business owner, solopreneur, that type of thing. Unless that’s already your current focus or current field that you work in, it’s a pretty significant time investment to learn how to stay on top of all the trends, how to beat the algorithms. You know where to put this and get it all out there. I’ve got to believe that in what you’re doing, you’re relieving them of that burden, that you’re the one that’s staying on top of those types of trends and learn how to get more placements.

ARI TAUB: Yes. Number one, you, you’re right. Video is, is taking over the planet and it’s changing very, very rapidly. Whatever the rules were around video six months ago, they’re not there anymore.

JAY: –Yeah.

ARI TAUB: You’re very regularly that companies go out of business when Facebook changes their algorithm. And the good news for entrepreneurs is if they just create good compelling videos that is the Lego blocks of everything else. And I don’t need people to create the perfect video right now.

JAY: –Hmm.

ARI TAUB: What I need is for them to create good quality videos with compelling content about things that they care about and they’re passionate about.

JAY: –Yep.

ARI TAUB: And Bank though.

JAY: –Mm.

ARI TAUB: And once they’re banked, then we can mix and match them and put them in a bowl and mix them up.

JAY: –Yep.

ARI TAUB: And if three minute videos become the thing on Facebook, we can make three minute videos and if 10 minute videos become the right thing, we can put together for two and a half minute videos and make a 10 minute video.

JAY: –Yeah, totally.

ARI TAUB: In my sports league business, I do this all the time. I’ve put a lot of different types of content onto TV and I see what the metrics are and whatever does well, we put more of it on and whatever doesn’t do well, we bank it and we wait for later and we figure out what we can do. Can we cut it down from 22 minutes to six minutes? Can we put for two minutes together and make an eight minutes?

JAY: –Right. And, and do you help your clients with any of that audio and video editing or is that something that they’re doing on their own?

ARI TAUB: I do have the ability to do that for, for some of our clients.

JAY: –Yeah.

ARI TAUB: The basic level of what we do is I take entrepreneurs video and get it onto TV.

JAY: –Yep.

ARI TAUB: As people need more sophistication, I can help them create cool TV shows, I can help them create series and I can help them edit the videos that they’ve already done.

JAY: Super Cool. You mentioned that the sports league, again, if you wouldn’t mind back us up to your wrestling days and then how you, how you go from being an Olympian to launching the sports league.

ARI TAUB: So you’re right. I competed in the Olympics in 2008 as a wrestler in China.

JAY: –Awesome.

ARI TAUB: And that was a 22 year journey.

JAY: –Wow.

ARI TAUB: You’re a, I won some, some matches. I lost some matches. I learned a lot about myself and about perseverance –

JAY: –Hmm.

ARI TAUB: -and it was a, it was a fantastic journey. And like I said, I competed in 2008 and I’m also a lawyer by trade and I was running a law firm and the law firm was doing a lot of real estate developments and you might remember back to fall of 2008 where were subprime happened –

JAY: –Yep.

ARI TAUB: -and sort of everyone in real estate, you know, had some difficulties. And so my, my law firm was relatively slow in the fall of thousand eight and I wasn’t wrestling anymore so it was trying to figure out what I was going to do. And, and one of my wrestling partners walked into my office and said, hey, we need to, we need to start a mixed martial arts finally. Kind of like a minor league to the UFC. And I didn’t know anything about it, but I was you know, looking for something to do, so I said fine. And, and the 2009 we had our first event and, and you know, we sold a thousand tickets and you know, but we didn’t sort of believe in audio and video and so there was really no light, no sound and –

JAY: –Yeah.

ARI TAUB: -you know, the fans had great time. But at the end of the night, you know, we were done –

JAY: –Hmm Mm.

ARI TAUB: -and then we had to turn around and go and sell a ticket again.

JAY: Right. And to your point, you know, the, the amount of work that you had to put in to have the event versus the amount of mileage you would get out of it if you did the event in recorded it. It’s not that much more work. Not that much more time. But you know, off the charts differential. And you know, I, I guess if there’s a takeaway to some of this is going to be a, for the listeners, if you’re going to put this much work in, you know, put on the event for example, or make the video, you might as.

ARI TAUB: That is exactly the message I go around in this convention sort of live event business that we’re in right now, personal developments and experts and speakers. And it amazes me how many people spend so much time and effort putting the event on and don’t bother to record it.

JAY: –Hmm.

ARI TAUB: And it really reminds myself of what I was like in 2009 I remember telling people I’m not wasting money on video.

JAY: –Yeah, totally.

ARI TAUB: Like I had all of these conversations and I was a relatively stubborn person and it took me years to, to figure out that I was actually in the video business and, and you know, putting the event on really just subsidize the video business when people paid to be there, you know, that offset the cost of the video recording.

JAY: Sure, totally. Interesting. So you see you mentioned perseverance, it’s earlier, you know, from your Olympic training. Any parallels that you note from your time either as an Olympic athlete or running the uh, sports league that parlay into what you’re doing now?

ARI TAUB: Sure. I think almost everything I’ve learned in life can be dialed down to life lessons through sport.

JAY: –Yeah.

ARI TAUB: You know, the practice makes you better. You’re not always going to win.

JAY: –Yep.

ARI TAUB: Generally it takes a team to succeed. Perseverance might be important.

JAY: –Hmm.

ARI TAUB: I think staying in shape, you know, doing your pushups, do, doing the little things in business that, that make it so that you don’t fall over.

JAY: –Yeah.

ARI TAUB: Life is sport. Entrepreneurship is for everything that I do well is because I practiced it a million times and score.

JAY: Right, right, right. For sure. I love that. What so, is where does this rank for you right now? You know, you’ve done some pretty cool stuff in your life. Where’s the excitement meter at for you around this new venture?

ARI TAUB: I’m really excited about entrepreneurs TV because I think when I started in, in the NMMA space, UFC was already there and it was already $1 billion company and, and it was very hard to, to compete and be a leader in the space. And I think right now there’s an opportunity for us to be the leader. And I think quite frankly, we are the leader in this space.

JAY: –Yup.

ARI TAUB: And it’s really cool to be able to watch entrepreneurs learn about video, learn about the power of the TV network in and their eyes light up when, when I say: “Hey, I can take your video, put it on TV” and they’re like: “really”?

JAY: –Yeah.

ARI TAUB: And that is, is really cool. And I think, you know, we have the ability to do something really special here and, and be ahead of the curve and that’s exciting to me.

JAY: Yeah. And well, what you’re doing is fairly a straightforward. There’s quite a bit of complexity involved on the back and, and so, uh, talk us through how long you worked on the business model of this venture and trying to figure out how to monetize this. You know, it’s got quite a few moving parts and a lot of them dependent on each other.

ARI TAUB: You’re 100% right. And quite frankly, if I had just came to this out of the blue, I could do it.

JAY: –Right.

ARI TAUB: I’ve actually been, you know, spending 10 years on this because everything I learned in the sport league relates to this.

JAY: –Yep.

ARI TAUB: How do I make a video? How do I make a video efficiently? How do I reuse of video? Where do I store a video? How do I upload a video?

JAY: The networks I would assume too.

ARI TAUB: Well exactly. I spent 10 years in millions of dollars developing relationships with, with these media companies and networks around the world and the only reason they pick up my call is because I’ve done major TV live pay per view events just like the UFC.

JAY: –Sure.

ARI TAUB: The world, I’ve had a one hour time slot in the US in prime time for a few years. Got a million fans on Facebook.

JAY: –That’s awesome.

ARI TAUB: I’ve actually done all of this stuff for 10 years, so I’m not telling people to do something that I’ve never done before. I’m, I’m really just showing people how I did what I did in score –

JAY: –Right.

ARI TAUB: -and how it’s possible to do it for coaches, speakers, authors, entrepreneurs.

JAY: That’s awesome. I love in this conversation, let’s make a, another quick pause here in here from our commercial sponsors, we’ll be right back. Folks here today with our Ito, founder of entrepreneur’s TV network. See you in a few. Welcome back to our final segment of today’s episode here on Know pain, Know gain. I’m your host Jay Rooke and we are with Ari Taub today who is the founder of entrepreneur’s TV network are, I know one of the things that, especially for the earlier stage, coaches, speakers, authors, experts, etc., that might still be working on developing their body of work and kind of some of their messaging. I know there’s going to be kind of this mentality around, Hey, I’m not ready. I’m not there yet. And basically, you know, keeping their goods on the shelf for way too long. And so they think they’re ready. And what happens is, you know, two more years go by and they’re onto a new project and still not ready and still not ready. And you know, how do you break someone without that mentality?

ARI TAUB: This is a great topic. I say to people, look, I take your video and put it on TV. And I think that people understand that concept.

JAY: –Hmm.

ARI TAUB: They mostly just thinks that they don’t qualify. They think they’re not telegenic-

JAY: -Hmm.

ARI TAUB: -or they think their videos are good enough or their message isn’t good enough. And I think that just isn’t correct. If you look at videos that, that do well, there’s people that aren’t telegenic. There’s people that have a message that quite frankly, I don’t care about.

JAY: –Hmm.

ARI TAUB: There’s people that have messages that aren’t, you know, professionally produced videos. So there’s all kinds of proof all over the world that good videos work and it doesn’t really matter if you haven’t done it before.

JAY: –Right.

ARI TAUB: So the message really is this is accessible to almost everyone. And the people that will succeed are the ones that take this opportunity to heart right now. They start to create videos and they don’t stop and they understand that they won’t be perfect. They understand they’re not going to hit it. You know, get a base hit every time at that. They understand they might actually fail two thirds of the time and that would make them an all-star.

JAY: –Right.

ARI TAUB: But they’re just committed to creating video and they’re committed to having someone like me on their team because if you create video and if you have the right connections, your videos can be on TV now and over time your videos will get better and you will get more exposure and you will become an expert in how to make videos that go viral and do the things that you want them to do.

JAY: Yeah, and I think there’s so much to be said for just getting after it and starting to be courageous enough to learn how to make those mistakes. There’s really no other way to do it and giving yourself that permission, but recognizing that unless you start, you don’t make any advancements either. And so I like what you said earlier about relating things back to sport and if we talk about, you know, what are the disciplines we do in sport, whether that’s exercising every day or stretching or strength training, etc. Making it be a discipline to create video I think is really compelling. And also remembering the content creator of the video, you’re always at liberty to hit delete. You know, if you don’t like it, you can. The whole thing, if it’s something that’s embarrassing or really doesn’t work for you, but oftentimes what you’re going to find is it’s not nearly as bad as you thought it was. And then you know, it’s like when you, if you cook for somebody else, you know what flaws might be in the dish and sometimes you feel compelled to call them out. But the person that’s eating it loved it all the same and didn’t notice any of them. And one of the things that I really appreciate is that people hear the message, they hear the way and when they need to hear it. And so recognizing that oftentimes if you’re a content creator, just getting that video out there, it doesn’t need to be your greatest work ever. The listener, if they like you, if they understand you, if they’ve got trust with you, they’re gonna get what they need to out of it. And it’s going to keep moving you forward. And so I guess the first thing that comes to mind for me, if I were coaching somewhere around this would be something around just get this going, start to make it a discipline. You don’t need to have the whole thing figured out yet. And then I think out of the other side of my mouth, I’d be saying, okay, now that you’re going to start to get this traction and some following from the videos, well let’s start to think about what the sales process and offering looks like that now monetizes this additional exposure and whatever that looks like. And so I’m curious, you know, how, how much do you get involved with helping either folks that are on your network a shape those messages, or is that something that they’re working on, on their own, you know, dependent on their business model.

ARI TAUB: You said so many great things in the last couple of minutes. I wanna try and go back and remember, the one thing you said that I want to push back on.

JAY: –Yeah.

ARI TAUB: If you don’t like a video push delete.

JAY: –Yep.

ARI TAUB: I would love to reframe that.

JAY: –Yeah, yeah.

ARI TAUB: If you don’t like the video, just keep it private.

JAY: –Fair enough.

ARI TAUB: You will not know when you’ve made a gym. Let me give you an example.

JAY: –Yeah.

ARI TAUB: Do you know who Ronda Rousey is?

JAY: –Yes. Yeah.

ARI TAUB: I’m sure a lot of your listeners will know who she is.

JAY: If Ronda has to be, happens to be listening right now you are on my targeted list of people to have on the show so I just want to throw that out there. But yeah, keep going.

ARI TAUB: Fantastic. So she happened to, to compete in my NMMA league before she went to strike force in the UFC.

JAY: –Yup.

ARI TAUB: It was back in the day when I didn’t really understand how to like the thing and I wasn’t fully committed to video and so as a result of video might not look world class, but guess which video of mine on Youtube has more views than any other one. It might be that Ronda Rousey won and, and you know, if we were talking about, well I only want to make world class videos, I would have press delete on that thing.

JAY: –Got Ya.

ARI TAUB: And I’m telling you, you’ve got some gyms in you and they might not actually be gyms for another five years. Just don’t start the camera, start recording, never stop. Feel free not to share what you don’t like, –

JAY: –Yeah.

ARI TAUB: -keep it. Because you never know when someone’s gonna come to you and go: “Oh hey, the video you just did, got 100,000 views on Ari’s platform. Have you got another five that are like on the same topic”? And you go: “Oh yeah, I did those stupid videos a couple of years ago and they were worthless and I didn’t use them and no one wanted them. But oh, someone wants them now, that’d be cool”.

JAY: –Yeah.

ARI TAUB: And you know how much effort that will take.

JAY: –Right.

ARI TAUB: It’s like let’s stick it on a Youtube playlist and all of a sudden already has it. Isn’t that cool?

JAY: Right. And so to that point, let, let’s pretend you know, I, I’m sort of your, your ideal type of client and I want to get involved in this discipline of creating video. And so I get myself all set up and it comes time to hit record. And all of a sudden I pause and I say to myself: “Oh crap, what am I even trying to talk about today”? You know, what’s your advice for that initial kind of warm up for folks to get going and get the juices flowing?

ARI TAUB: If it was me, I would think about what videos I need to create for all of my social marketing. And um, who are you? What do you do? Why do you do it? What do you stand for? You know, explain what, what your product or service is, you know, how does it fit into the world? How does it fit into current events? I think…that is the right approach. Create video for purposes that you already know about.

JAY: –Yup.

ARI TAUB: And then we look at the Bank of video and we start talking about how we can put it together –

JAY: –Mm.

ARI TAUB: -into other videos that look more like a TV show.

JAY: –Yep.

ARI TAUB: And once you get more sophisticated and you’ve started to do some videos that you like as TV shows, then what you do is you think about, oh, I’m hosting an event where I get to speak for three days.

JAY: –Yup.

ARI TAUB: Maybe I’ll allocate a few hours to talk about things that I’m going to want to have in my TV show anyway.

JAY: Yup.

ARI TAUB: And maybe I’ll make sure that I have that event recorded so that I walk away from the event with my TV show, three quarters done. And so we start to think about the end at the beginning. What types of shows do I want to make, what messages do I want to get across? And then I just start talking about them. But let me go back to one of the things I said in the beginning.

JAY: –Sure.

ARI TAUB: We don’t know what we don’t know –

JAY: –Hmm.

ARI TAUB: And all of the rules are gonna change every six months.

JAY: –Yeah.

ARI TAUB: So just turn the camera on. Just start talking. It’s really easy to edit afterwards, but it’s impossible to get it back if you don’t record.

JAY: Right, right, right. Well said. And do you think, you know, I guess what’s next after this? Right. You know, I, I got assume that that although the landscape will change in technology is going to move forward. I just don’t see video getting antiquated the way some other mediums have a, and not nearly as quickly.

ARI TAUB: I think you’re right. I, I don’t know what would replace video. I, it seems to me that artificial intelligence is going to come more front and center technology is going to get better at, at serving you the videos that you want to watch right away, –

JAY: –Hmm.

ARI TAUB: -voice search is, is going to be bigger. You’ll say, Alexa, I want to learn about x, Y and z.

JAY: –Right.

ARI TAUB: And quite frankly, you know your video better be, you know, searchable by Alexa or your now left behind.

JAY: –Yep.

ARI TAUB: So, uh, until I guess, you know, people start communicating in a new way that we haven’t figured out yet. Like you know, Star Trek type ways.

JAY: –Yeah, yeah.

ARI TAUB: You know, it seems like video is going to be there and I think the object is going to be how do we be searchable and how do we be available where people want to watch because people have so many options of where to watch and, and what we call TV is changing now. People don’t watch Facebook only on their phone right now. People turn on their 60 inch TV, –

JAY: –Right

ARI TAUB: -if cut the cord. They don’t bother paying for Comcast, but they watch you know Netflix and Youtube and Facebook on their 60 inch TV.

JAY: –Yup.

ARI TAUB: So this concept of, Oh, I don’t have to, you know, make that video good quality is only being watched on a phone in seven 20 actually isn’t the right concept because it’s now being watched on four k on a 60 inch TV. And another story about this to really drive the point home, –

JAY: –Yeah.

ARI TAUB: -Youtube has changed their algorithm to prioritize videos that are produced better.

JAY: –Mm.

ARI TAUB: So in the past people, it’s like, oh, there’s all these Youtube celebrities that are, you know, kids that wear shorts and don’t go to work and make videos on their phones. And that’s what Youtube is about. And you know, some of the people on this show, you know, watching or listening to this show might know that Youtube has Youtube TV now –

JAY: –Hmm.

ARI TAUB: -and you can actually watch things like the NBA finals on Youtube now and professionally produced World class TV shows. And so, uh, in the next couple of years what we’re going to find is better produced four k format video. We’ll do better on Youtube. So the rules are always going to change. Just keep recording.

JAY: That’s the big message today. And just keep recording. And I guess going back to the inspiration behind this, I completely understand the sports league and that seems like a natural progression uh, from the Olympic wrestling and everything, but what became the, the, the love affair, the, the draw towards supporting entrepreneurs and making this be an entrepreneur’s network versus the other mediums that you could’ve chosen?

ARI TAUB: I just think because it’s, it’s a relatively new frontier and it’s an opportunity for me to be ahead of the curve and to

JAY: –Yeah, yeah

ARI TAUB: -and to be the world’s,  leading it’s hard to compete with a sports league that you know is valued at $4 billion.

JAY: –Sure.

ARI TAUB: But it’s really cool to, to watch entrepreneurs eyes light up when I say: “Hey, I can get you on TV”.

JAY: Right. And, and also, you know, the timing of this venture where entrepreneurship is more popular, perhaps a then it’s been a super long time. And so I love the time you don’t have your work as well.

ARI TAUB: Thank you.

JAY: So what, uh, what is next? Really wait, what are you working on next in the business? What would be that one thing that would really uh make your, your growth pot?

ARI TAUB: I’m doing two things. The first is I’m securing more TVD [inaudible] , that our video goes more places.

JAY: –Yep.

ARI TAUB: I’m working on getting our channel embedded into smart TVs. I’m like Samsung and LG and Vizio and in fact we do have some deals signed or some of those –

JAY: –Cool.

ARI TAUB: -and you know on, on deals into China and Africa and South America. I’m working to get on to TV in the United Kingdom in England. I’m working on a, uh, for cage and a lot of platforms like Comcast, all of that is designed to get more exposure and credibility for our entrepreneurs. And at the same time I’m trying to get entrepreneurs to, to know that entrepreneurs TV exists and to sign up and to create more video and to start playing while, while we’re growing –

JAY: –Mm.

ARI TAUB: -because the last video on the platform that, that the, the more impact, a new entrepreneurs going to have on that platform.

JAY: Yeah. So that sounds like a perfect Segway. So if entrepreneurs out there, coaches, speakers, experts, etc. And wants to follow up, want to explore being on the platform is right for them, what’s the best way for folks to engage with you?

ARI TAUB: As it happens? The best place for them to get more information is through your website and your link.

JAY: Well there we go. So, so if that’s the case folks, what to do is hop over to jayrooke.com forward slash be on TV that b e o n t v and Ari’s got a little video for you there. That’ll explain, uh, what the platform is and you can check out and see if it’s something that you’re interested in. If what you’re currently seeking is getting some more exposure, uh, additional branding and more platforms, etc. And just being able to get your message out there to more people on a TV. So thank you for sharing that with us. I really appreciate the opportunity for folks to collaborate with you.

ARI TAUB: You’re welcome and let me give you one more site where folks can go and actually watch some of the shows that are there, which is www.entrepreneursnetwork.tv.

JAY: Awesome. All right. I know behalf of myself and all of our listeners, I want to say thank you for the time that you’ve carved out a to be with us today. I think what you are creating is really exciting from an entrepreneurial point of view just in your own right in launching this massive undertaking and making it happen, but also for all of this out there that are working on, you know, increasing business success, raising the vibration of folks, getting greater awareness, all that personal development, good stuff that is going to get in front of more people as a result of what you’re doing. I want to say thank you for that. So really excited what you got going on.

ARI TAUB: You’re welcome. Thanks for having me.

JAY: Awesome. Hey folks, that’s it for today is another episode of Know pain, Know gain. I’m your host Jay Rooke signing off with special thanks to Ari Taub, founder of entrepreneur’s TV network. We’ll catch you on the next episode.

 

Leave a Comment